Addendum: Texts I Taught This Year and EDGAR ALLAN POE

Recently I wrote about both the well-received texts I taught this school year (Of Mice and Men, “The Cremation of Sam McGee”) and the “misses” (The Picture of Dorian Gray, Heart of Darkness). Not that anything here is to say that the “misses” weren’t texts students didn’t learn from. For example, though “Julius Caesar” can …

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The Great, the Good, and the OK: Texts I Taught This Year

With finals going currently, here are some thoughts on novels, stories, and plays I used in my classroom over the last school year. It’s always interesting to experience something as a student and then as a teacher. Take Heart of Darkness: the dialogue is richer than what I remember from high school, and the novel is …

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One Year in North Carolina (or: How I Got a Job After 90 Rejections)

This weekend Leah and I have lived in North Carolina for a year. There are many things I could reflect upon, given the anniversary, but when I think back, what comes most to mind is rejection. Now, things a year ago with Leah were going great—she wasn’t the one rejecting me. And things with the …

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Gigantic Book Donation (Or, What Books Were Bestselling 1960-Present?)

Last weekend our school received an enormous donation of books. So I spent the afternoon with members of the National Honor Society and Beta Club boxing up the haul and loading them into a horse trailer. On the side note of high school students, when all was said and done they took out sheets of …

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In Brief: Fifth Snow Day and Book Reading

Last Wednesday was my school’s fifth snow day of the school year. For students this is a cause for celebration, though for teacher’s, a headache. It’s a pretty good illustration, I believe, of different long-term thinking abilities—students aren’t considering that we’ll now have a total of five days tacked onto the end of the school …

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